Diabetes Education

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If your blood sugar isn’t in check, you’re putting your entire body in danger

Health Tip: Managing Meals With Gastroparesis

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(HealthDay News) -- Gastroparesis occurs when food in the stomach empties more slowly than it's supposed to. It's more common in people with diabetes.

If you have the condition, the American Diabetes Association recommends:

  • Eat small amounts of food throughout the day, rather than larger meals.
  • Eat your meals slowly.
  • Sit upright after you eat.
  • Take a walk after eating.
  • Avoid food that's high in fat or fiber.
  • May 11, 2017
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-- Diana Kohnle
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Transplant of Insulin-Producing Cells Offers Hope Against Type 1 Diabetes

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By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists report a step forward in the plan to create a truly artificial pancreas, offering new hope to people with type 1 diabetes.

A 43-year-old single mother with dangerously difficult-to-control diabetes had insulin-producing islet cells transplanted into her omentum -- a fatty membrane in the belly.

The cells began producing insulin faster than expected, and after one year she is doing well and doesn't need insulin injections, the University of Miami researchers said.

"We're exploring a way to optimize islet cell therapy to a larger population. This study gives us hope for a different transplant approach," said the study's lead author, Dr. David Baidal. He's an assistant professor in the university's Diabetes Research Institute.

Others voiced optimism as well. "This study was a good start at evaluating a novel site for transplant," said Julia Greenstein, vice president of discovery research for JDRF (formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation).

  • May 10, 2017
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SOURCES: David Baidal, M.D., assistant professor, division of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism, and clinical cell transplant program, Diabetes Research Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine; Julia Greenstein, Ph.D., vice president, discovery research, JDRF; May 10, 2017, <i>New England Journal of Medicine</i>

Health Tip: Create a Sick-Day Plan for Diabetes

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(HealthDay News) -- When you're sick, your blood glucose can fluctuate sharply. So if you're diabetic, it's important to plan for changes triggered by illness.

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases says your plan should include:

  • How frequently you should check your blood glucose.
  • Checking your blood and urine for ketones.
  • Changes to your usual insulin or medication doses.
  • What you should eat and drink.
  • Which events should prompt a call to your doctor.
  • May 5, 2017
Attribution: 
-- Diana Kohnle
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Red Wine Antioxidant Might Help Diabetics' Arteries

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By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, May 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The antioxidant resveratrol -- found in red wine, peanuts and berries -- might improve the health of blood vessels in people with type 2 diabetes, a small study suggests.

The study found that resveratrol supplements lessened artery stiffness in some people with type 2 diabetes. Stiffening of the arteries, called arteriosclerosis, raises the risk of heart attack and stroke.

"In treatment with resveratrol among people with diabetes, there was a trend toward improvement in the stiffness. And in people with higher stiffness there was more of a benefit," said lead researcher Dr. Naomi Hamburg. She is chief of the vascular biology section at Boston University School of Medicine.

While the research suggests there might be ways to improve blood vessel abnormalities in people with type 2 diabetes, it's too soon to recommend resveratrol for that purpose, said Hamburg.

"We would need a longer study to look at whether this is going to reduce heart attacks and stroke," she added. "But I think this is evidence to support future research."

  • May 4, 2017
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SOURCES: Naomi Hamburg, M.D., assistant professor, medicine, chief, vascular biology section, Boston University School of Medicine; Byron Lee, M.D., professor, medicine, and director, electrophysiology laboratories and clinics, University of California, San Francisco; May 4, 2017, presentation, American Heart Association meeting, Minneapolis

Type 2 Diabetes May Be Bad for Brain Health

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By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, April 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Previous research has linked type 2 diabetes and memory loss. Now, new research may be closing in on some of the reasons why.

The study found that people with type 2 diabetes -- particularly those who are overweight or obese -- have thinner gray matter in several areas of the brain.

These brain regions are related to memory, executive function, movement generation and visual information processing, said the study's senior author, Dr. In Kyoon Lyoo. He's director of the Ewha University Brain Institute in Seoul, South Korea.

"Obesity leads to increased risk of type 2 diabetes, metabolic dysfunction and is also associated with brain alterations independently," Lyoo said. "We aimed to investigate whether overweight/obesity influenced brain structure and cognitive function in individuals with early stage of type 2 diabetes."

The study included: 50 overweight or obese people with type 2 diabetes; 50 normal-weight people with type 2 diabetes, and 50 normal-weight people without diabetes.

  • April 28, 2017
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SOURCES: In Kyoon Lyoo, M.D., Ph.D., director, Ewha University Brain Institute, Seoul, South Korea; Sami Saba, M.D., attending physician in neuromuscular medicine and electromyography, department of neurology, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; William Cefalu, M.D., chief scientific, medical and mission officer, American Diabetes Association; April 27, 2017, <i>Diabetologia</i>

Health Tip: Coping With the 'Dawn Phenomenon'

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(HealthDay News) -- The "dawn phenomenon" is a natural surge in hormones in the morning that affects everyone.

For people with diabetes, a corresponding rise in blood glucose could be dangerous.

The American Diabetes Association suggests:

  • Eat your dinner earlier in the evening.
  • After dinner, go for a walk or engage in another physical activity.
  • If your fasting glucose is still high after taking these steps, see your doctor.
  • April 27, 2017
Attribution: 
-- Diana Kohnle
Source: 

Health Tip: Continuous Glucose Monitoring Devices

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(HealthDay News) -- Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices constantly track your blood sugar levels to help you manage diabetes.

The Cleveland Clinic says potential benefits of a CGM device include:

  • Real-time updates of your blood glucose (sugar) level.
  • An alarm that alerts you when your blood glucose is too high or too low.
  • The ability to export blood glucose readings to a computer, providing a record for your doctor.
  • April 26, 2017
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-- Diana Kohnle
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Obesity Quadruples Kids' Type 2 Diabetes Risk: Study

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TUESDAY, April 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Close to 13 million American children and teens are obese, and new research shows they may be four times more likely than kids with a healthy weight to develop type 2 diabetes by age 25.

Between 2002 and 2005, there were 3,600 cases a year of type 2 diabetes among U.S. kids and teens, according to the Endocrine Society's Endocrine Facts and Figures report. A large study of British children produced similar results, the researchers noted.

"As the prevalence of obesity and being overweight has rapidly risen, an increasing number of children and young adults have been diagnosed with diabetes in the United Kingdom since the early 1990s," said study co-author Ali Abbasi, a research fellow at King's College London.

For the study, published April 25 in the Journal of the Endocrine Society, the researchers reviewed health records of 375 general practices in the United Kingdom.

The team compared the diabetes status and body mass index (BMI) of about 370,000 children between the ages of 2 and 15. BMI is a measure used to determine if someone is a healthy weight for their height.

  • April 25, 2017
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SOURCE: The Endocrine Society, news release, April 25, 2017

The Top 5 Conditions That Shorten Americans' Lives -- And Are Preventable

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MONDAY, April 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- More bad news for plus-sized Americans: Obesity is the leading cause of preventable life-years lost in the nation, a new study finds.

Obesity steals more years than diabetes, tobacco, high blood pressure and high cholesterol -- the other top preventable health problems that cut Americans' lives short, according to researchers who analyzed 2014 data.

"Modifiable behavioral risk factors pose a substantial mortality burden in the U.S.," said study lead author Glen Taksler, an internal medicine researcher at the Cleveland Clinic.

"These preliminary results continue to highlight the importance of weight loss, diabetes management and healthy eating in the U.S. population," Taksler said in a clinic news release.

Obesity was linked with as much as 47 percent more life-years lost than tobacco, his team said.

Tobacco, meanwhile, had the same effect on life span as high blood pressure, the researchers found.

  • April 24, 2017
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SOURCE: Cleveland Clinic, news release, April 22, 2017

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